Vision to restore Roundhouse

The Roundhouse building is home to a 100ft turntable, the largest one in WA, which was installed in 1957 and the depot opened two years later on March 30,1959. Photo: supplied
The Roundhouse building is home to a 100ft turntable, the largest one in WA, which was installed in 1957 and the depot opened two years later on March 30,1959. Photo: supplied

Collie’s post-war building, the Roundhouse will hopefully be receiving funding after Collie-Preston MLA Mick Murray recently approached the National Trust regarding future visions for the building. 

Earlier this year the Shire of Collie council voted unanimously to nominate the Roundhouse for consideration for the national heritage list, which it is now part of. 

The building, is home to a 100ft turntable, the largest one in WA, which was installed in 1957 and the depot opened two years later on March 30,1959. 

​The building also used to house 14 steam locomotives and was lastly used as a steam depot in 1972.

V1213 being turned on the 100ft Collie turntable June 7, 1992.

V1213 being turned on the 100ft Collie turntable June 7, 1992.

The National Trust of Western Australia senior manager Kelly Rippingale said Mr Murray recently approached them regarding future visions for the site. 

“Along with the Shire of Collie and South West Regional Development Commission we are hoping that funds will be granted to prepare conservation and master plans for the site. At present there is not a definitive project however we are hopeful that funding will be announced in the near future,” she said.

The National Trust of WA have had the railway round house in their care since 2011, when they took over the land transfer from the Public Transport Authority. 

Mrs Rippingale said they were pursing state government funding of $65,000 for investigations, planning and community consultation for a contamination investigation, clean-up of asbestos at the site and develop more accurate funding requirements to implement conservation work.

The Roundhouse is built of off-form concrete walls,columns, and precast concrete beams and has corrugated asbestos clad walls, timber platforms, steel girders and supporting posts, and concrete foundations, according to the Heritage Council State Heritage Office.  

Light work for the crew - turning this V class at Collie meant standing in this control cabin to operate the electric mechanism.

Light work for the crew - turning this V class at Collie meant standing in this control cabin to operate the electric mechanism.

Collie Heritage and Menshed Group member Ian Bushell and vice president Keith Robinson said they approached the National Trust last year about doing something about the building. 

“We approached the National Trust last year, we got a quote to remove the asbestos for only $15,000 and about the management of it but it went back to the Public Transport Authority,” Mr Robinson said.

“There’s been talk about doing something with it, I would like to see something done because when it’s empty it deteriorates more.”

Mr Murray said there had been discussions but no firm proposals for a potential use for the Roundhouse.

“At this stage we are talking with the National Trust to see where the Collie Round House stands and how it can be utilised going into the future,” Mr Murray said. 

“We are currently exploring the options available for the Collie Round House going into the future.”