Darkan farmer selected for delegation

Local farmer Craig Lubcke was selected by ANZ to attend the banks sixth customer delegation to Asia. Photo: Supplied
Local farmer Craig Lubcke was selected by ANZ to attend the banks sixth customer delegation to Asia. Photo: Supplied

Darkan farmer Craig Lubcke was recently selected by ANZ to attend their sixth customer delegation in Asia.

He was one of 22 Australian farming businesses selected where he visited Inner Mongolia, Shanghai and Singapore with a focus on the sheep and wool industries and to gain more skills on how they can better do business overseas.

Mr Lubcke was sent to the delegation to learn more about the potential impacts to the local agriculture industry.

ANZ also launched their latest insight report on the sheep and wool industries including at the industry function in Shanghai.

Themes featured in the report included an analysis of the historical industry trends that may impact future growth, and the future workforce dynamics and impact to the agriculture industry.

It also featured information on the domestic demand and international trade - trade overview, consumer trends, emerging markets, competition, and on wool processing and trade - evolution of supply chain and impacts on pricing.

Local farmer Craig Lubcke was selected by ANZ to attend the banks sixth customer delegation to Asia. Photo: Supplied

Local farmer Craig Lubcke was selected by ANZ to attend the banks sixth customer delegation to Asia. Photo: Supplied

ANZ agribusiness manager Sabin Ivey said the feedback those who attended the delegation was overwhelmingly positive.

"It really opened their eyes to the challenges and opportunities that exist for sheep meat and wool in Asia," he said.

Although China is the largest market for Australian mutton and lamb, sheep meat only makes up 5 per cent of the local meat consumption.

Pork makes up the largest proportion at 62 per cent but is being effected by the risks from African swine flu that has appeared in the region.

Mr Ivey said the wool processors in China are under pressure from their high-end buyers over Australia's continued practice of mulesing.

"The themes we are seeing in other markets around trace-ability and sustainability remain important," he said.

"Australia and it's producers need to get better and selling our story to connect the consumer with their food and maintain a level of premiumisation."