South West Aboriginal Medical Service starts new program for disabled

Djooroobidiny Program team members Troy Albert, Craige Sell and Naydeene Edwards. Photo supplied.
Djooroobidiny Program team members Troy Albert, Craige Sell and Naydeene Edwards. Photo supplied.

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service have been out and about in the community to see how they can best support people living with a disability.

The Djooroobidiny Program was set up in May with aim to create better linkages for aboriginals with a disability and the relevant support services. Program coordinator Naydeene Edwards said the program three parts to it, consultation, peer support and public awarenesss.

The program is still in the consultation phase, with the team travelling around the South West receiving feedback. Ms Edwards said the support was out there but the challenge was that people don't acknowledge their disability.

"There isn't alot of awareness of what having a disability is and there is also a lot of shame as well," she said.

"We are trying to educate the community on all the different aspects associated with disability because many people don't realise they can access help with what they have."

Program coordinator Craige Sell said there wasn't a word for disability in their native language which made it harder to talk people about what it means.

The team chose to call the program Djooroobidiny because it means 'go along happily' and that is what they hope people will get out of the program.

"We want them to live a fulfilled life and be the best they can be," Mr Sell said.

The team have already visited Busselton and Margaret River, but a survey will be available online in the coming weeks.

There are also community meetings that will be held in Bunbury, Brunswick, Harvey and Collie.

Mr Sell said they also wanted people to come forward and be part of the program's public awareness campaign.

He hopes to see a broad range of people come forward and be part of the campaign in a bid to break down the stigma of what it means to be disabled.

"We want to shed light on how people can live a quality life with a disability," he said.

For more information, visit swams.com.au

This story Breaking down stigma of disability first appeared on Busselton-Dunsborough Mail.